Molyvos Life

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Ship wreck in Molyvos

 

ship wreck 1

ship wreck 1

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Late December a fishing boat when off course and hit rocks on the second bay of Molyvos before the harbour.

 

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Nobody was hurt and the boat was completely destroyed. The captain and crew swam to shore.
The crew lost all their belonging 2014-12-28 15.24.56

Greek Traditions For New Years On Lesvos

Father Christmas in Greece, known as Agios Vassilis (Saint Basil/ Basillis/ Bill), comes with  the arrival of the New Year, bearing gifts.

It is tradition for the first visitor who comes to your home after the clock chimes 12.00  to knock on your door and when you open the door to him he will have a big stone with him, a jug of water and a pomegranate. He places the stone on the floor, pours the water over it and then breaks the pomegranate. This ritual is one to bring good luck to your home for the year ahead. Whilst he is performing the ritual he is also chanting words similar to these: “As heavy as this stone is, may your pockets be from abundance of money….As this water pours, may the happiness and laughter pour into your home….. As the same way the pomegranate seeds spread across your floor may the joy and heath spread across your home.

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wishes for 2015

 

SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING COURSE IN MOLYVOS

Molyvos tourist association

 http://www.theotheraegean.com organised a seminar called Social Media Marketing.  Of which they also contributed to the cost.

social media marketing

It was a two day course of which over 50 people with different businesses from Lesvos took.

We were captivated

We were captivated

It was a very enjoyable experience. We all learnt many things which should be a great help in our being able to introduce Molyvos and Lesvos to the world.

Our speaker was Panos Kazanelis, who kept our interest and made the event fun. With lot of humour and laughter helped keep our attention for the many hours that was needed to complete this course.

http://www.about.me/panoskazanelis

 

The seminar was held in the Delfinia hotel and Andonis and crew looked after us very well serving us with coffee and delicious biscuits when we needed a break

THE TRIP

Feeling excited as it was an excursion which we rarely do. Something we always plan but too busy in the summer and somehow too busy/lazy in the winter. Arranged by the committee of restaurants for the second time to cut the pita (the pie for the New Year). This is a tradition that is done all over Greece where a pie/pita (sweet) is cut with a coin inside and whoever gets the piece with the coin is lucky for the rest of the year.

A bus trip to visit olive oil factory in Yera , Ouzo factory in Plomari and lunch.

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An amazing assortment of people turned up. All from restaurants in Molyvos and Scala Sikamia. People we never hang out with so it makes this excursion all the more interesting.

We passed through Kalloni with all the incredible birds in the salt flats, a working olive factory with lots of smoke pouring out of its chimney in Dipi, a flock of birds resting on electric wires, the flat as ice sea in the gulf of Yera and wonderful views through the bus windows.

Arriving in Yera village that has olive trees growing close to the water edge, there is the sign that directs you to the Olive press museum which is in the centre of the village, one of the first steam –powered  factories on Lesvos. Olive oil is the second biggest income to the island after tourism.

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Some where worth going

A fantastic project.  A decayed building which took 3 years to be restored.  Photos of the before and after are hanging in every area of the building.  It was very impressive. Personal hand held speakers in both Greek and English to direct/explain the tour of the museum. Well worth the visit!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Off to Plomari where we stopped first at the Museum of Barbayannis (one of the oldest ouzo factories) just before the main town.

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The entrance to the factory of Oyzo Barbayanni

Ouzo is made from pure alcohol made from sugar beet, grapes and sugar cane in factories that are over seen by the government. It must be very pure and clean alcohol so the taste is not affected. The alcohol is distilled and 35 different herbs and spices are introduced of which the main one is aniseed, that is grown for them in Lisvori and then dunked in salt water to keep the aroma of the herb longer. Once the ouzo is distilled it must be kept for 45 to 60 days in large vats which make it become sweeter and be able to be drunk.

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This is only one of the distillers

There are 15 distilleries on Lesvos that make ouzo.

Lesvos produces over half of the total amount of ouzo produced in Greece

Ouzo is exported to over 35 countries.

bottling oyzo at the factory of Barbayanni

bottling oyzo at the factory of Barbayanni

Our next stop was the village Plomari. One of the largest villages of Lesvos. Once with over 12,000 inhabitants now with just under 3000 including the foreigners (we were told) . Impressed as compared to Molyvos it looked massive. Banks, supermarkets galore but many buildings in ruin.   We noticed a lot of buildings built by a special green stone that created a lovely and different design.

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I have not seen such a large Platanos tree in Greece

Our final destination was lunch at a restaurant called Mouria, just outside the village of Plomari, which served us very fast and had great food.

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The Captain’s Table, Theo and Melinda

THE CAPTAIN’S TABLE EARNS 2013 TRIPADVISOR CERTIFICATE OF EXCELLENCE

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Honoured as a Top Performing restaurant as Reviewed by Travellers on the

World’s Largest Travel Site

 

Molyvos, Lesvos, Greece – 28 Jun. 13 – The Captain’s Table a Mediterranean / local restaurant today announced that it has received a TripAdvisor® Certificate of Excellence award. The accolade, which honours hospitality excellence, is given only to establishments that consistently achieve outstanding traveller reviews on TripAdvisor, and is extended to qualifying businesses worldwide. Only the top-performing 10 per cent of businesses listed on TripAdvisor receive this prestigious award.

 

To qualify for a Certificate of Excellence, businesses must maintain an overall rating of four or higher, out of a possible five, as reviewed by travellers on TripAdvisor, and must have been listed on TripAdvisor for at least 12 months. Additional criteria include the volume of reviews received within the last 12 months.

 

The Captain’s Table is pleased to receive a TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence,” said Theodoros Kosmetos and Melinda McRostie the owners, at The Captain’s Table. “We strive to offer our customers a memorable experience, and this accolade is evidence that our hard work is translating into positive reviews on TripAdvisor.”

 

 “TripAdvisor is delighted to celebrate the success of businesses around the globe, from Sydney to Chicago, Sao Paulo to Rome, which are consistently offering TripAdvisor travellers a great customer experience,” said Alison Copus, Vice President of Marketing for TripAdvisor for Business. “The Certificate of Excellence award provides top performing establishments around the world the recognition they deserve, based on feedback from those who matter most – their customers.”

 

Molyvos, lesvos Greece

This is a lovely unspoilt Greek village on the island of Lesvos called Molyvos. The perfect place to come a have your unforgettable holiday

MOVING IN MOLYVOS FESTIVAL 7-9th OF JUNE 2012

The Moving in Molyvos festival is part of a new creative approach to the promotion of the island’s well-known health-giving properties such as the natural hot spring spas. These are already enjoyed by both holiday-makers and participants in the many health and well-being seminars held on the island every year.
Now the local tourist association is bringing together the many teachers and workshop leaders working on Lesvos to celebrate their work in this unique three-day event.

The festival offers the chance to take part in a fascinating series of workshops, open to men and women, at the special festival price of 5 euro per class in:

• Yoga  (three different forms)
• Nia,
• Tai Chi
• Chi Gong,
• Healing Dances and songs
• Aqua therapy. 
• Greek dancing
• Eastern Belly dancing
• Nature walks

 All participants are invited to a series of complimentary Greek lessons and special free evening events:

 • Welcome drinks to introduce the festival and the teachers

• Sunset at Molyvos castle with ouzo and traditional Greek music

• A chance to dance! Enjoy a short performance of Greek dances  

    before getting up and joining in – encouraged by some Greek wine   

    and snacks.

 During the festival, there will be an exhibition of classic and contemporary work by local artists at the Trifon building on the harbour every evening, with free entrance for everyone.

All the festival events are designed to complement each other and to foster well-being, strengthen the mind and body, and energize the individual.

You can look at the festival programme and create your own, personal  timetable of classes, leaving time to experience the special energy and vibrance of Greece’s third largest island.

On our part, we look forward to welcoming you and providing a unique experience that maximises every aspect of Molyvos- our very special Aegean village.

A significant proportion of the festival income goes to local charities.

For more information check out our website. http://www.movinginmolyvos.com 

SPRING CLEANING IN MOLYVOS !

 

Spring and sunshine finally came to Lesvos last weekend after an amazingly cold winter and how did we celebrate?

We went to the old rubbish dump of Molyvos (Mythymna) and cleaned it up.

Set high up in the mountains behind Eftalou, it is an area of outstanding beauty and we wanted to restore it to its natural state.

 

With rubber gloves to the ready we marched forth to be horrified at how much rubbish there was still left there.

 

3 Tons of rubbish was collected, organised by the environmental group of the Molyvos Tourist Authority, the volunteers included residents of the village, the local scout group and even a group from the Mitilyne Post Office who drove 60 kilometers to join us.

However, Sky TV who were supposed to be filming the day didn’t show up but an interview was given by telephone. So, we didn’t make it on to the television but we got great suntans. 

There is still more rubbish but at least we are happy to be moving in the right direction and hope that this initiative will be taken up by many more local groups.

 Melinda.

 

Waves

There are many waves in lifeThrough the Trees.                                                                                                                               

Waves hitting the shoreStones washed away.

These pictures were taken by  Elpi Deligianni.

A Greek Jewel

There is an American film made in 1954 that sometimes reminds me of Molyvos. It is called ‘Brigadoon’ directed by Vincente Minnelli and it tells the story of a magical Scottish village of that name that rises out of the mists once in one hundred years so that the inhabitant may enjoy one day of their lives before it sinks back into timelessness for another one hundred years. Two American trout fishermen wander into the village and find that they never want to return to the so-called real world. When they finally do so they are affected by an excruciating nostalgia for the place they have lost.

The similarities with Molyvos are startling and not a little disturbing. I have been coming to Molyvos for over forty years now with my partner Julie Copeland and I have known visitors who have strayed into the village (your uncle and aunt were two such people, Melinda) who came for a few weeks and never left. You can sometimes see these time lord castaways wandering along its beaches and sheltered coves behaving like bird watchers but in fact looking, in a somewhat bemused way, for a key out of the place.

Molyvos spins a special kind of enchantment. It is geographically an island attached to an island. It sits on its peninsula like a jewel brought up out of the depths by a skin diver with a pastoral mixture of farmland, habitat and seascapes on three sides. Wherever you look Nature is there. The mother island, Lesbos is always somewhere else, on the horizon, or looking over our shoulders. This location recreates a special ambience, a perfect balance between nature and culture.

I come here each year to write. There must be some kind of creative pact between me and the village that I don’t remember signing, some kind of erotic electricity because the feeling when I return is not just that this is in many ways my second home (although that is a fantasy – I know like the two American fishermen in Scotland somewhere in the back of my head that it isn’t and that I will have to leave – but that I am being plugged into a mysterious kind of cosmic force. The creative juices loosen up after the tough round of teaching at a film school, freelancing as a critic and broadcaster and generally trying to make trouble for whichever government is in power in Australia. And I begin to write as though I had never left my desk here. I don’t keep count of the number of poems I have composed in Molyvos but I do know that I have written over fifty short stories and five novels while being comfortably ensconced in one of the most beautiful landscapes that I have ever seen. Best of all the village is still somewhat difficult to get to, especially from the Antipodes. The relative, the tax collector, the student asking for immediate attention can’t find you here.

This other neutral space, keeping the rest of the world at arm’s length, also applies to the village’s inhabitants. One day I am going to sit down and write a soap opera (day time television and Ophrah will love it). We can go away and come back the following year and there is always an electrifying family drama taking place or continuing the next exciting episode somewhere: the last mayor has run off with the village post mistress; the proprietor of a local pensione has been transformed into a Greek version of Faulty Towers and thrown out all his clients from England because he doesn’t like the sound of the language; a mad animal loving Swedish couple has tried to take a dozen cats- tom, feline and ten kittens – back to Stockholm in a basket disguised as a container for fetta cheese. I must say that your own family too is pretty good on the domestic drama chapters. At this level Molyvos reminds me of one of those big shell-like Greek theatres with the principals groaning and tearing out their hair while a line up of townspeople playing the chorus mutter into their coffees and ouzos that nothing good can come of such public carry-ons.

It is true that time brings change. We have lived together through the dark years of the military dictatorship, the hardships and sometimes poverty of a village in those days of the sixties and seventies depending on its fishermen and farmers for sustenance and the first years after the collapse of the junta when the tourist buses and package tours began to pour into the place bringing great changes, not always tactful, no, let’s face it downright ugly, to its valley and foreshore. But somehow behind the commercial crassness that did bring jobs and financial relief to many the real village, the timeless village still sits there in the labyrinthine allies and winding stone staircases so that I can say hello to Therapiotis stitching his nets on the doorstep of his house or your stepfather, the ‘captain’ of the Captain’s Table whom I have known since he was about eighteen, a boy going to do military service and now a great sea captain sitting in his retirement having a parea with his mates outside one of the cafenios. Or the women who screech the gossip across the rooftops: ‘Akous’ Kale!!’ The many microcosmic kindnesses from such people that make this not just a holiday place but a living, breathing organism. In that sense its sense of a community, of a humanism that still values the individual and gives us, its guests a space to be individuals, is timeless.

There are tough times descending on Greece. The money men will pack their carpet bags and do a runner. The international tour operators will move on to Syria, Morocco or Madagascar. Perhaps the village will have to rethink its way of life as indeed the rest of Greece will. But this quality that I am trying (and failing) to pin down, this marvellous beauty invested by light, calm and sensuality as the poet Verlaine dreamed of, inhabited by decent, hard working and parea loving individualists, will survive and thrive. It is like the myth of the lost island of Atlantis that rose out of the water and sat above a jewel faceted sea and became a touchstone for the classical world of a perfectly balanced civilization, the Golden Mean which the actual classical world hardly ever achieved in spite of its rhetoric and its searching. We are the lucky ones who accidentally stumbled upon Atlantis.

(C) Dr. John Slavin